Loose Cannon Strikes Again — See Also

How Diversity Plays Out In Promotions To Partnership In Biglaw – Above the Law



Ed.
Note:

Welcome
to
our
daily
feature

Trivia
Question
of
the
Day!


According
to
data
collected
by
Leopard
Solutions,
in
the
last
year,
what
percentage
of
promotions
to
partnership
in
the
top
200
Biglaw
firms
did
ethically
diverse
attorneys
receive?


Hint:
In
terms
of
gender
diversity,
60
percent
of
the
promotions
to
partnership
were
given
to
men.



See
the
answer
on
the
next
page.

If I Worked As An Associate Attorney, I Might Want The ‘Severance’ Procedure – Above the Law

I
recently
finished
the
show
“Severance”
on
Apple
TV,
and
the
program
was
absolutely
amazing!
I
can’t
remember
a
more
original
science
fiction
show
in
recent
years,
and
the
program
tackles
work-life
balance,
which
has
become
more
important
than
ever
in
the
work-from-home
environment.
Essentially,
the
show
involves
workers
who
undergo
the
severance
procedure,
which
ensures
that
their
work
self
does
not
know
anything
about
that
person’s
personal
life.
In
addition,
once
a
person
leaves
their
workplace,
they
do
not
remember
anything
about
what
went
on
at
work.
Although
the
show
is
somewhat
dystopian,
it
seems
as
if
the
severance
procedure
would
be
great
for
many
law
firms.
I
was
recently
speaking
with
a
bunch
of
lawyers
about
whether
they
would
sign
up
for
severance
if
they
could,
and
many
believed
that,
if
given
the
option,
they
would
like
to
separate
work
memories
from
personal
ones
like
on
the
show.

One
huge
problem
with
law
firms
is
that
people
often
need
to
take
work
home
with
them.
Partners
often
want
associates
to
respond
to
matters
at
all
times
of
the
day
or
night
and
when
the
office
is
closed.
In
the
vast
majority
of
instances,
matters
can
wait
until
work
time.
Law
firms
are
notorious
for
establishing
artificial
deadlines,
and
exigent
matters
that
require
immediate
attention
are
rare
within
the
legal
profession.
Establishing
a
severance
would
ensure
that
bosses
could
not
unduly
impede
on
the
personal
time
of
their
workers
unless
there
is
an
“overtime
contingency”
as
fans
of
the
show
already
know.

Moreover,
it
is
easy
for
attorneys
to
take
the
stress
of
their
jobs
home
with
them.
Most
people
within
the
legal
profession
will
readily
agree
that
the
legal
industry
is
extremely
stressful.
Not
only
do
lawyers
need
to
deal
with
office
politics
and
the
other
stressors
that
impact
all
kinds
of
office
workers,
but
they
need
to
deal
with
the
confrontation
that
is
omnipresent
in
legal
matters.
I
for
one
definitely
take
stress
home
with
me,
and
stressful
times
at
work
can
impact
my
sleep,
my
exercise
routines,
and
other
parts
of
my
personal
life.

Folks
who
undergo
the
fictional
severance
procedure
would
be
incapable
of
taking
stress
home
with
them
when
they
leave
the
office
each
day.
Indeed,
those
workers
would
not
be
able
to
even
remember
the
matters
at
work
which
made
them
stressed
out
to
begin
with.
I
am
willing
to
bet
many
lawyers
would
add
years
to
their
lives
and
have
less
gray
hair
if
they
were
unable
to
remember
the
matters
that
caused
them
stress
in
the
workplace.

One
of
the
reasons
why
severance
is
billed
as
important
in
the
show
is
because
it
helps
ensure
confidentiality
of
matters
worked
on
at
an
office.
If
people
could
not
remember
what
they
did
in
a
workplace,
they
would
be
unable
to
blab
about
it
after
they
returned
home.
Although
the
legal
profession
has
ethical
restrictions
on
what
people
can
say
about
their
work,
lawyers
talk
all
the
time
about
their
work,
sometimes
in
inappropriate
ways.
Something
akin
to
the
severance
procedure
would
help
lawyers
keep
secrets
better
which
might
improve
client
relations
and
the
sanctity
of
client
confidences.

Of
course,
there
are
also
plenty
of
reasons
why
severance
might
not
be
helpful
in
the
legal
industry.
For
one,
attorneys
often
need
to
have
a
personal
as
well
as
a
work
relationship
with
clients.
Many
people
forge
deep
connections
with
clients,
either
because
clients
are
already
friends
with
the
attorney
or
the
lawyer’s
relative,
or
because
the
lawyer
and
client
have
worked
together
for
years.
It
would
be
impossible
for
lawyers
to
have
the
same
amount
of
connection
with
clients
if
they
could
not
discuss
work
matters
with
clients
in
a
more
casual
setting,
which
happens
often
in
the
legal
profession.

Moreover,
much
of
a
lawyer’s
job
takes
place
outside
of
an
office.
Lawyers
usually
need
to
hit
the
road
in
order
to
attend
court
hearings,
depositions,
site
inspections,
and
all
manner
of
proceedings
related
to
the
matters
upon
which
they
work.
In
the
show,
severance
was
only
possible
spatially
in
an
office,
so
the
procedure
as
described
in
the
show
would
not
be
practical
for
many
lawyers.
Moreover,
lawyers
rely
on
prior
lived
experiences
much
more
than
other
office
workers,
including
the
worker
in
the
show.
Lawyers
need
to
have
ready
recall
of
prior
situations
with
clients
over
the
years
in
order
to
know
what
to
do
in
any
given
situation.
In
the
show,
people
subject
to
the
severance
procedure
are
unable
to
recall
any
personal
details
about
themselves,
which
would
prove
an
impediment
in
the
legal
industry.

All
told,
many
within
the
legal
industry
would
likely
want
a
technology
that
can
separate
their
work
memories
from
their
personal
life
in
order
to
promote
work-life
balance.
However,
this
would
probably
difficult
to
implement
in
practice
because
lawyers
rely
on
the
aggregate
of
their
lived
experiences
to
perform
solid
work
for
clients.




Rothman Larger HeadshotJordan
Rothman
is
a
partner
of




The
Rothman
Law
Firm
,
a
full-service
New
York
and
New
Jersey
law
firm.
He
is
also
the
founder
of




Student
Debt
Diaries
,
a
website
discussing
how
he
paid
off
his
student
loans.
You
can
reach
Jordan
through
email
at




jordan@rothmanlawyer.com
.

Gaining Perspective – Above the Law

(Image
via
Getty)

In
life,
we
have
two
certainties:
death
and
chocolate.
Rich
and
creamy
chocolate.
I
bet
you
thought
I
was
going
to
say
taxes,
right?
We
can’t
escape
taxes
(well,
most
of
us)
but
death?

Death
is
coming
for
us
all!
Mwahahaha
(this
post
is
starting
off
great)!

On
a
serious
note,
I
attended
a
funeral
this
week,
which
is
always
a
clarity-giving
occasion.
The
funeral
was
my
first
in-person
service
post-COVID
(which
has
normalized
the
Zoom
funeral).
At
this
particular
funeral,
the
pastor
mentioned
that
losing
a
loved
one
is
never
easy,
whether
you
had
a
bad
relationship
with
the
decedent
or
a
wonderful
one.
When
I
lost
my
beloved
dad,
one
of
my
biggest
regrets
was
not
spending
enough
time
with
him
and
making
more
memories.

I
am
grateful
for
funerals,
not
because
I
relish
death
and
loss,
but
because
funerals
are
stark
reminders
that
none
of
us
will
live
forever.
Knowing
this
often-overlooked
fact,
gives
me
the
opportunity
to
decide
what
I
want
to
do
in
the
finite
time
I
have
left.

I
find
myself
asking
probing
questions
like:

  • How
    am
    I
    prioritizing
    my
    loved
    ones
    and
    spending
    time
    with
    them
    rather
    than
    letting
    work
    run
    my
    decisions?
  • Am
    I
    living
    the
    life
    I
    want
    to
    live?
  • Are
    there
    any
    places
    I’d
    like
    to
    visit?
  • Am
    I
    showing
    up
    as
    my
    whole
    self
    every
    day?
  • Is
    my
    career
    fulfilling?

When
running
a
law
firm,
it
is
imperative
to
remember
that
we
get
the
opportunity
to
live
now.
Today.
This
second.
Putting
off
a
good
quality
of
life
or
ignoring
mental
health
in
favor
of
hustle
and
grind
is
not
the
answer.
Many
of
us
are
familiar
with
lawyers
who
have
encountered
terrible
outcomes
due
to
their
choices.

We
will
all
experience
death.
God
willing,
no
time
soon!
Even
though
I
frequently
speak
about
planning
and
death
as
an
estate
planning
lawyer,
I
know
it’s
not
fun
to
talk
about
such
things
in
a
blog
post.
In
one
of
my
presentations,
I
mentioned
Bronnie
Ware,
a
former
palliative
nurse
in
Australia.
Bronnie
wrote
an
article
called
“Regrets
of
the
Dying”
about
her
time
as
a
palliative
nurse.
Bronnie
worked
with
dying
patients,
developed
close
relationships
with
them
during
their
last
weeks
of
life,
and
came
up
with
five
of
their
most
common
regrets:

  1. I
    wish
    I’d
    had
    the
    courage
    to
    live
    a
    life
    true
    to
    myself,
    not
    the
    life
    others
    expected
    of
    me.
  2. I
    wish
    I
    hadn’t
    worked
    so
    hard.
  3. I
    wish
    I’d
    had
    the
    courage
    to
    express
    my
    feelings.
  4. I
    wish
    I
    had
    stayed
    in
    touch
    with
    my
    friends.
  5. I
    wish
    I
    had
    let
    myself
    be
    happier.

(That
fifth
wish
always
gets
me!)

When
your
end
comes,
what
do
you
want
your
legacy
to
be?
How
do
you
want
to
be
eulogized?
Do
you
want
to
be
remembered
as
a
workaholic
who
missed
out
on
life
experiences
and
loved
ones
because
of
running
a
firm?
Or
as
an
avid
gardener
who
spent
free
time
with
their
hands
in
the
dirt?
Maybe
you
want
to
be
remembered
as
an
active
parent
who
prioritized
their
child
at
the
expense
of
making
more
money.
There’s
no
right
or
wrong
answer
to
these
questions.
You
get
to
decide
and
work
through
the
discomfort
(if
any).

I
hope
I
left
you
food
for
thought.
If
you’d
like
to
share,
send
me
an
email
at
info@iffyibekwe.com.
I
always
love
to
hear
from
you!




Iffy Ifeoma Ibekwe HeadshotIffy
Ibekwe
is
an
estate
planning
attorney
and
evangelist
for
intergenerational
wealth
transfer
with
effective
wills
and
trusts.
Iffy
is
a
prolific
speaker
and
she
is
writing
her
first
book
on
culturally
competent
estate
planning,
available
in
2024
(prayers
up!).
She
graduated
from
The
University
of
Texas
School
of
Law
and
has
practiced
law
for
over
16
years. Iffy
can
be
reached
by
email
at 
info@iffyibekwe.com,
on 
her website,
and
on
Instagram
at 
@iffyibekweesq.

Personal Injury Law Firm Marketing – Above the Law

There
is
tough
competition
among
personal
injury
law
firms.
Whether
your
business
is
competing
on
a
local,
state,
or
national
level,
you
need
to
constantly
ensure
your
marketing
strategies
are
complying
with
best
practices
to
ensure
you
are
reaching
as
many
potential
clients
as
possible.
Personal
injury
law
firm
marketing
is
complex,
but
we
can
break
it
down
into
manageable
steps.


The
Importance
of
a
Solid
Marketing
Strategy

A
reputable
and
visible
online
presence
can
benefit
a
law
firm
in
numerous
ways.
Not
only
can
you
carve
out
a
space
for
yourself
in
a
niche
market,
but
you
can
also
boost
lead
generation
and
overall
profits.

While
there
are
different
outlets
under
which
attorneys
can
obtain
clients,
like
referrals
and
walk-ins,
the
majority
of
people
seek
legal
guidance
or
representation
in
2022
simply
plug
their
query
into
Google
and
look
to
the
search
engine
to
guide
them
to
who
can
best
help.

When
you
optimize
your
law
firm’s
search
engine
optimization
(SEO)
strategy,
you
can
set
yourself
apart
from
the
other
personal
injury
law
firms
in
your
competitive
areas.


The
Economics
of
Personal
Injury
Law
Firm
Marketing

Getting
off
the
ground
with
a
law
firm
marketing
strategy
can
be
expensive
and
time-consuming–especially
if
you
are
starting
from
scratch.
Whether
you
handle
the
tasks
yourself
or
outsource
to
a
digital
marketing
company,
you
must
plan
to
build
and
maintain
your
website,
use
some
form
of
paid
advertising,
and
incorporate
regular
social
media
usage
into
your
marketing
strategy.

There
is
no
one-size-fits-all
budget
when
it
comes
to
law
firm
marketing.
However,
to
get
an
idea
of
what
may
be
reasonable,
calculate
what
it
takes
to
obtain
a
single,
successful
case.
Consider
how
many
clients
you
need
to
have
in
a
year
in
order
to
improve
conversion
rates
and
ensure
your
business
is
profitable.
Once
you
have
an
idea
of
what
you
need
to
spend
to
make
a
profit,
you
can
begin
drafting
the
strategies
to
do
so.


Getting
Started
With
Personal
Injury
Law
Firm
Marketing

In
terms
of
getting
started
with
law
firm
marketing,
you
first
need
to
evaluate
your
law
firm’s
status.
For
example,
you
may
just
be
starting
out
and
looking
to
generate
an
online
presence
quickly.
Your
firm
may
also
be
well-established
but
losing
clients,
prompting
a
change
in
how
you
handle
your
online
marketing.
No
matter
the
situation,
there
are
two
concepts
you
need
to
consider
before
implementing
new
strategies,
including
your
target
audience
and
your
consumer
appeal.


Who
Is
Your
Target
Audience?

Have
you
ever
considered
what
makes
a
potential
client
“ideal”
for
your
law
firm?
While
you
know
there
is
a
possibility
you
will
not
or
cannot
take
every
case
that
walks
through
your
door,
having
a
concrete
concept
of
your
target
audience
will
help
you
narrow
down
your
marketing
strategies
and
produce
content
that
answers
common
questions
and
encourages
visitors
to
reach
out
for
more
information.
When
building
an
ideal
client
profile,
consider
factors
like
age,
geography,
economic
status,
education
level,
career
path,
accident
or
injury
types,
etc.


What
Makes
Your
Law
Firm
Stand
Out?

With
so
many
personal
injury
attorneys
in
the
United
States,
setting
yourself
apart
from
the
rest
can
be
a
challenge.
However,
remember
that
you
have
unique
experiences
in
the
area
of
personal
injury
law
that
differentiate
you
from
other
lawyers.
If
you
do
not
know
where
to
start
with
determining
what
makes
your
law
firm
stand
out,
simply
start
with
a
list
of
your
education,
experience,
and
credentials.
From
there,
you
can
determine
why
you
are
the
best
option
for
your
target
clients.


Law
Firm
Marketing
Strategy
Versus
Plan

In
order
to
create
a
cohesive
and
comprehensive
online
law
firm
presence,
you
need
to
develop
both
a
law
firm
marketing
strategy
and
plan.
A
strategy
establishes
elements
like
your
marketing
goals,
target
audience,
offered
services,
and
core
message.
In
contrast
to
that,
your
marketing
plan
specifies
the
actions
you
may
take
to
achieve
your
marketing
goals
and
the
types
of
marketing
you
plan
to
use–like
SEO
or
social
media
marketing.


Law
Firm
Marketing
Strategy

A
succinct
marketing
strategy
begins
with
an
executive
summary
that
outlines
the
following
categories:


  • Marketing
    goals.

    Your
    marketing
    goals
    need
    to
    align
    with
    your
    firm’s
    business
    goals.
    Working
    with
    your
    marketing
    department
    or
    specialists
    to
    ensure
    alignment
    occurs.

  • Target
    audience.

    Based
    on
    our
    discussion
    above,
    you
    know
    just
    how
    crucial
    defining
    your
    target
    audience
    is.
    When
    it
    comes
    to
    using
    that
    information
    to
    inform
    your
    marketing
    tactics,
    you
    will
    include
    it
    in
    your
    strategy
    outline.

  • Marketing
    analysis.

    Conducting
    a
    marketing
    analysis
    includes
    the
    people,
    businesses,
    or
    organizations
    that
    are
    your
    current
    and
    prospective
    clients.
    Remember
    to
    capture
    a
    clear
    picture
    of
    the
    size
    of
    your
    law
    firm
    based
    on
    your
    practice
    areas
    and
    geographic
    location.

  • Competitive
    analysis
    .
    Another
    aspect
    of
    your
    marketing
    strategy
    is
    the

    competitor
    analysis
    .
    To
    beat
    out
    your
    competitors,
    you
    need
    to
    understand
    what
    strategies
    they
    are
    implementing.
    You
    can
    use
    tools
    like

    Google
    Analytics

    to
    get
    a
    better
    idea
    of
    what
    your
    competition
    is
    doing.
    Services
    offered.
    While
    you
    already
    know
    what
    areas
    of
    law
    you
    practice,
    it
    is
    still
    a
    good
    idea
    to
    outline
    the
    legal
    services
    you
    provide
    in
    your
    marketing
    strategy
    document.
    This
    can
    inform
    your
    future
    content
    strategy.

  • Core
    message.

    What
    do
    you
    want
    your
    target
    audience
    to
    know
    about
    your
    law
    firm?
    If
    you
    have
    not
    already
    developed
    a
    core
    marketing
    message,
    take
    a
    look
    at
    your
    law
    firm’s
    mission.
    The
    two
    messages
    will
    likely
    be
    similar,
    if
    not
    the
    same.


Law
Firm
Marketing
Plan

Once
you
understand
how
you
want
to
improve
your
law
firm’s
online
presence,
it
is
time
to
start
devising
a
detailed
plan.
Doing
so
can
not
only
save
you
time
and
effort,
but
it
can
also
make
it
clear
to
your
employees
who
is
responsible
for
what.
Elements
of
a
personal
injury
law
firm
marketing
plan
include
the
following:


  • Goals.

    In
    order
    to
    see
    success
    from
    your
    marketing
    plan,
    you
    need
    to
    set
    quantifiable
    goals.
    Some
    of
    your
    marketing
    strategy
    goals
    may
    overlap
    or
    inform
    your
    plan
    goals.
    Make
    sure
    your
    goals
    are
    measurable,
    so
    you
    can
    track
    their
    progress
    as
    you
    reach
    milestones.

  • Financial
    investment.

    Your
    plan
    should
    include
    an
    estimate
    of
    how
    much
    you
    plan
    to
    budget
    and
    spend
    on
    your
    law
    firm
    marketing.
    There
    is
    no
    right
    or
    wrong
    answer
    to
    determining
    what
    to
    invest,
    and
    that
    figure
    will
    likely
    change
    over
    time.

  • Marketing
    activities
    .
    Marketing
    activities
    include
    content
    development,
    advertising,
    social
    media,
    email
    marketing,
    and
    more.
    You
    will
    want
    to
    implement
    a
    number
    of
    activities
    to
    boost
    your
    chance
    of
    meeting
    your
    goals
    and
    building
    your
    online
    presence.


Executing
Your
Law
Firm
Marketing
Tactics

If
you
follow
the
guidance
above
and
develop
a
marketing
strategy
and
plan,
you
can
start
planning
its
launch.
You
may
choose
to
roll
out
different
tactics
on
a
scheduled
basis,
or
you
could
launch
everything
all
at
once.
Either
way,
the
execution
of
your
tactics
will
include
three
main
elements:
SEO,
content
production,
and
advertising.

Your
website
must
be
user-friendly.
You
can
consult
with
the
latest
SEO
best
practices
to
learn
how
to
improve

user
experience
.
Page
load
speed
and
functionality
are
often
at
the
top
of
the
list.
The
longer
it
takes
your
website
to
load,
the
more
opportunity
there
is
for
a
potential
client
to
go
somewhere
else.

In
terms
of
content
production,
you
will
want
to
ensure
you
have
comprehensive
practice
area
pages
for
the
areas
you
provide
legal
services.
Remember
to
include
keywords
that
potential
clients
are
likely
to
search.
You
should
also
have
a
regularly
updated
blog
that
provides
easily-digestible
information
on
frequently
asked
questions,
relevant
law
changes,
and
other
topics
of
interest.

In
terms
of
advertising,
you
can
implement
a
number
of
strategies.
You
may
choose
to
start
using
pay-per-click
(PPC)
ads
through

Google
Ads
.
You
also
have
the
option
to
advertise
on
social
media
platforms
like
Facebook.
No
matter
where
you
choose
to
advertise,
remember
to
evaluate
the
results
regularly,
so
you
know
you
are
getting
the
most
for
the
money
you
are
spending.



Annette
Choti,
Esq.
graduated
from
law
school
20
years
ago,
and
is
the
Founder
of

Law
Quill
,
a
legal
digital
marketing
agency
focused
on
small
and
solo
law
firms.
Annette
wrote
the
bestselling
book

Click
Magnet:
The
Ultimate
Digital
Marketing
Guide
For
Law
Firms
,
and
hosts
the
podcast

Legal
Marketing
Lounge
.
She
is
a
sought-after
keynote
and
CLE
speaker
throughout
the
United
States
and
Canada.
Annette
used
to
do
theatre
and
professional
comedy,
which
is
not
so
different
from
the
legal
field
if
we
are
all
being
honest.
Annette
can
be
found
on

LinkedIn

or
at


annette
@lawquill.com
.

Samuel Alito Freaks Out That Anyone Dares To Question The Great And Powerful Supreme Court – Above the Law

(Photo
by
Chip
Somodevilla/Getty
Images)

Guess
what?
Members
of
the
Supreme
Court
are
still
very
concerned
about
the
legitimacy
of
the
Supreme
Court.
You’ll
recall
Chief
Justice
John
Roberts’s desperate
plea,

practically
begging
folks
to
see
the
Court
as
legitimate.
That
was
rebutted
by

Elena
Kagan
,

repeatedly
,
in
what
was
pretty
much
a
direct
response
to
Roberts’s
take
on
the
current
state
of
the
Court.

Now
Samuel
Alito
has
entered
the
chat.

Alito
previously
told
a
judicial
conference,
“Simply
because
people
disagree
with
an
opinion
is
not
a
basis
for
questioning
the
legitimacy
of
the
court,”
and
that
the
Court’s
role,
”doesn’t
change
simply
because
people
disagree
with
this
opinion
or
that
opinion
or
disagree
with
the
particular
mode
of
jurisprudence.”

But
he
wasn’t
content
to
let
those
words
sit.
In
a

comment
to
The
Wall
Street
Journal
,
Alito
threw
a
hissy
fit
that
anyone
dares
question
the
Court:
“It
goes
without
saying
that
everyone
is
free
to
express
disagreement
with
our
decisions
and
to
criticize
our
reasoning
as
they
see
fit.
But
saying
or
implying
that
the
court
is
becoming
an
illegitimate
institution
or
questioning
our
integrity
crosses
an
important
line.”

What
then
does
it
say
about
a
jurist
that
would
rather
lash
out
rather
than
listen
when
colleagues
are
leveling
fair
criticism?

Kagan’s

already
done

a
pretty
stellar
job
explaining
what’s
up
to
the
thick
headed
like
Alito.
But
make
no
mistake,
the
Court’s
decision
in


Dobbs
v.
Jackson
Women’s
Health

has
changed
how
the
nation
forever
perceives
SCOTUS.

Regardless
of
what
you
think
of
abortion,
here’s
what
we
know
that
makes

Dobbs

distinct:
(1)
it
took

away

a
right
that
has
been
enjoyed
for
over
50
years.
Conservatives
attempt
to
compare
the
decision
to

Brown
v.
Board
of
Ed.

overturning
the
abominable
legal
protection
of
segregation
enshrined
in

Plessy
v.
Ferguson
.
But
in
that
instance
the
Court

and
an
unanimous
one
at
that


extended

rights
instead
of

curtailing

them.
(2)
After
the

Dobbs

case,
sitting
U.S.
Senators
went
on
record
saying
they
were

personally
misled

when
members
of
the
Court
testified
that
they
believed

Roe
v.
Wade

was
established
precedent.
And
then
those
judges,
you
know,
went
ahead
and
overturned
it
anyway.
Now,
let’s
put
aside
questions
as
to
whether
those
sitting
Senators
were
dumb
marks
or
knowingly
accepting
the
lie
when
those
representations
were
made,
but
it
remains
a
continuing
part
of
the

Dobbs

conversation.

Let’s
talk
about
the
other
big
reason
the
Supreme
Court’s
legitimacy
is
in
the
toilet:
stolen
seats.
Mitch
McConnell
unilaterally
decided
not
to
take
a
vote
on
Merrick
Garland’s
Supreme
Court
nomination.
It
was
a
wild
shock
that
had
literally
never
been
done
before,
but
he
made
up
some
mealy-mouthed
excuse
and
ran
with
it.
Then
when
the

exactly
analogous
situation

arose
upon
the
passing
of
Ruth
Bader
Ginsburg,
well,
McConnell
rushed
through
the
nomination
of
Amy
Coney
Barrett.
These
bold
shenanigans
created
the
exact
margin
in
one
of
the
most
controversial
cases
of
all
time
and
Alito
has
the
unmitigated
gall
to
suggest
that
he’s
SHOCKED
that
people
are
questioning
the
legitimacy
of
the
Court?
Get
a
fucking
grip.

Listen,
the
power
of
the
Court
is
always
tenuous

there’s
no
army
that
goes
around
enforcing
the
Court’s
decisions.
But
previous
Courts
have
been
acutely
aware
of
that
fact
and
chosen
to
tread
cautiously
as
they
make
new
law.
Like
when
Earl
Warren
worked
overtime
to
ensure
the

Brown

decision
would
be
9-0
to
ensure
it
would
be
viewed
as
legitimate.
Notice
that
he
didn’t
callously
throw
the
power
of
5+
votes
around
like
Alito’s
majority
did
in

Dobbs
.
The
scorched
earth
rhetoric
and
slipshod
historical
analysis
in

Dobbs

were
merely
window
dressing
for
the
majority’s
political
result.

But
here’s
Alito,
unwilling
to
even
listen
to
criticism.




Kathryn
Rubino
is
a
Senior
Editor
at
Above
the
Law,
host
of

The
Jabot
podcast
,
and
co-host
of

Thinking
Like
A
Lawyer
.
AtL
tipsters
are
the
best,
so
please
connect
with
her.
Feel
free
to
email

her
 with
any
tips,
questions,
or
comments
and
follow
her
on
Twitter
(@Kathryn1).

Will More Biglaw Firms Join In On The Associate Deferral Party? – Above the Law


[Some
firms]
may
take
the
opportunity
to
let
go
of
attorneys
because
they
can
do
so
without
being
in
the
spotlight.


I’m
not
convinced
it’ll
hit
the
industry
across
the
board.
Given
how
much
work
has
slowed,
some
firms
may
have
overhired.
But
I
don’t
think
every
firm
fits
into
that
category.





Summer
Eberhard
,
a
legal
recruiter
at
Major,
Lindsey
&
Africa
in
San
Francisco,
in

comments
given

to
the
American
Lawyer
on
Gunderson
Dettmer’s
decision
to

defer
the
start
date
for
the
firm’s
incoming
associate
class
.
As
we
first
reported,
the
firm
confirmed
the
delay,
and
a
spokesperson
stated
that
“this
is
a
personnel
matter
and
we
have
nothing
more
to
say.”



Staci ZaretskyStaci
Zaretsky
 is
a
senior
editor
at
Above
the
Law,
where
she’s
worked
since
2011.
She’d
love
to
hear
from
you,
so
please
feel
free
to

email

her
with
any
tips,
questions,
comments,
or
critiques.
You
can
follow
her
on

Twitter

or
connect
with
her
on

LinkedIn
.

The Return Of ‘On Course’: Your Guide To The Changing Practice Of Law – Above the Law


We’re
pleased
to
announce
the
return
of
“On
Course,”
produced
in
partnership
with
our
friends
at
Practising
Law
Institute.


Segmented
by
industry
areas,
this
channel
will
include
original
surveys
and
research,
the
latest
in
CLE
offerings,
expert
guidance,
podcasts,
and
more
in
the
coming
months. 


Please
feel
free
to
fill
out
the
form
below
to
subscribe
to
our
biweekly
newsletter. 

Building A Practice Around Trauma-Informed Lawyering – Above the Law

In
this
episode,
I
welcome
Rena
Paul
and
Margaret
Gandy,

founders
of
Alcalaw
,
to
talk
about
how
they
started
building
a
practice
around
trauma-informed
lawyering.
Rena
and
Margaret
describe
the
route
was
from
studying
in
law
school
to
navigating
their
way
into
the
world
of
law
to
establishing
their
own
practice.
They
also
give
a
piece
of
their
mind
surrounding
the
effects
of
cultural
awareness
and
the
dissolving
of
NDAs.

JAB129 QUOTE 3 (1)

The
Jabot
podcast
is
an
offshoot
of
the
Above
the
Law
brand
focused
on
the
challenges
women,
people
of
color,
LGBTQIA,
and
other
diverse
populations
face
in
the
legal
industry.
Our
name
comes
from
none
other
than
the
Notorious
Ruth
Bader
Ginsburg
and
the
jabot
(decorative
collar)
she
wore
when
delivering
dissents
from
the
bench.
It’s
a
reminder
that
even
when
we
aren’t
winning,
we’re
still
a
powerful
force
to
be
reckoned
with.

Happy
listening!




Kathryn
Rubino
is
a
Senior
Editor
at
Above
the
Law,
host
of

The
Jabot
podcast
,
and
co-host
of

Thinking
Like
A
Lawyer
.
AtL
tipsters
are
the
best,
so
please
connect
with
her.
Feel
free
to
email

her
 with
any
tips,
questions,
or
comments
and
follow
her
on
Twitter
(@Kathryn1).